Reports


While waiting at my bank the other day (they were counting a jar of coins) I picked up a 4-page paper setting next to my chair. The bank is West Coast Bank and the “Economic Forecast” was by William B. Conerly, Ph.D. of Conerly Consulting LLC. The date of the paper was January/February 2010.

I have only a limited understanding of economics, although I did take a year of it while in college ever so long ago. One thing that caught my eye was the comparison of the value of the U.S. dollar side by side with the Oregon and Washington employment forecasts. As the employment numbers rose in the period 2006 into 2008, the value of the U.S. dollar dropped. When employment dropped in 2008 through 2009, the value rose; but then dropped again in the second half of 2009.

The forecast is that both Oregon and Washington employments have bottomed out as of the beginning of 2010 and will rise throughout this year (2010).

The second item that caught my eye was that the 10th largest Pacific Northwest Trading Partner is United Arab Emirates (UAE). It only took me a minute to grasp that this must be because they must have purchased a bunch of Boeing aircraft. A quick look through Google and I came upon this statement on a Boeing website: Emirates, one of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) main airlines, is the largest operator of Boeing’s 777. UAE has also ordered Boeing 6 C-17 cargo aircraft.

Let’s keep that oil money flowing back into our United States industries.

Mr. Conerly has quite a bit of information available on his site which you can get to HERE.

UNICEF Report

UNICEF, the United Nations Children’s Fund, was created in December 1946 in response to the European children who were facing famine and disease at the end of World War II. It has become the premier advocate for children in the world. Here is a link to a brief outline of the organization’s history.

In 2007 UNICEF published their Innocenti Report Card 7, 2007 with the title Child poverty in perspective: An overview of child well-being in rich countries. The shocking conclusion is that the United States is ranked next to the bottom of the 21 industrialized nations reported on.

The six dimensions used for comparison were: material well-being; health and safety; educational well-being; family and peer relationships; behaviors and risk; and subjective well-being. The US was in the bottom half of all dimensions researched. (The US was not reported on in this final dimension category do to incomplete data.)

Rather than giving you any more details about this report, I strongly suggest you download it from the UNICEF website and read it for yourself.

Here is a quote from the introductory pages of the repost: The true measure of a nation’s standing is how well it attends to its children – their health and safety, their material security, their education and socialization, and there sense of being loved, valued, and included in the families and societies into which they are born.

 

 

Two reports from the ETS (Educational Testing Service) should be “must reading” for everyone interested in quality education for children.

The first, Parsing the Achievement Gap, the author, Paul Barton, “synthesizes a large body of research that identifies those factors associated with educational attainment and then looks at their relationship to differential performance by groups in our society.” (from the Preface by Drew Gitomer of ETS.) This document placed along side the second report, The Family: America’s Smallest School, by Barton and Richard J. Coley give a relative concise (81 pages total in the two reports) summary of major factors affecting especially early childhood education and learning.

The on-line pdf files for these two reports can be found on the ETS web sight at:

Parsing: http://www.ets.org/Media/Education_Topics/pdf/parsing.pdf

And The Family at: http://www.ets.org/Media/Education_Topics/pdf/5678_PERCReport_School.pdf

I could take a lot of time here summarizing these reports, but the documents deserve your time to read them completely.

Over the next week I will be absorbing another report. This one from UNICEF, Innocenti Research Centre, Report Card 7. The rather long title is:

Child poverty in perspective: An overview of child well-being in rich countries; A comprehensive assessment of the lives and well-being of children and adolescents in the economically advanced nations.

Copyright 2007 by The United Nations Children’s Fund.

I rather like the introductory comment:

The true measure of a nation’s standing is how well it attends to its children – their health and safety, their material security, their education and socialization, and their sense of being loved, valued, and included in the families and societies into which they are born.